Cystic Acne On Buttocks

Updated Sep,2020

Cysts can form on the buttocks. However, "cystic acne" in that region is not technically acne. It's actually a condition known as folliculitis, which is an infection of the hair follicles. Over time, it can become infected and turn into a cyst, which still requires prompt medical treatment.

Cystic acne—the most serious type of acne

Cystic acne is a severe form of acne whereby an inflammation occurs deep within the skin. Since it's so deep, it's much more difficult to treat compared to regular forms of acne, like blackheads and whiteheads. Regular pimples are fairly superficial and only impact the surface of the skin. But when cystic acne forms, it's more sensitive and painful.

Cystic acne usually impacts the face. But it has been known to develop on the back, shoulders, chest, and upper arms. Certain individuals are more likely to develop cystic acne, such as:

  • Teenagers
  • Men
  • People with a family history of cystic acne

While this condition can be painful or itchy, it's important to not pop or pick it. You need to see a medical professional instead.

What causes cystic acne?

The jury is still out on what precisely causes cystic acne. However, there are several theories that may hold some weight.

  • Diet - In general, some foods seem to make people's acne worse. This includes foods high in sugar as well as dairy products.
  • Family history - While acne affects everyone differently, you're probably more likely to get it if your parents had it. However, behavioral changes, such as maintaining a different diet from your parents, may limit its severity in you.
  • Hormonal changes - Acne is more likely to occur when your hormones fluctuate wildly. Puberty certainly results in this, but pregnant and menopausal women also have a greater risk due to changes going on in their bodies.

Cystic acne occurs mostly on the face, not your butt

Cystic acne most commonly affects the face. But in other cases, it also develops on the chest, back, and arms.

The reason for this is due to oil glands. Hormonal imbalances or shifts in the body can stimulate oil production. This leads to a growth of bacteria within your pores. In some people, this leads to a breakout underneath the skin. On the surface, this leads to a large, red bump that's more severe than a regular pimple.

Cystic acne has been found to be more prevalent around the mouth and on the chin. But it doesn't happen on the buttocks.

Butt acne isn't actually acne—let us explain

If you notice what looks like acne on your buttocks, then you need to know that those bumps are not actually acne. In fact, it's the result of inflammation in the hair follicles that lead to a condition called folliculitis. Ultimately, it's caused by a fungal or bacterial infection.

This can occur from waxing, wearing tight clothing, or chronic rubbing. Folliculitis may begin as small lumps, but over time, it can result in itchy, large cysts that require prompt medical attention.

Is the bump on my butt a cyst or a boil?

Various treatments are available to treat cysts and boils. But the right one for you depends on what precisely you have. There are a few key details that can help you identify what you have on your body.

Cyst

  • Slow-growing
  • Smooth
  • Usually on the face, back, or chest

Boil

  • Looks like a pimple
  • Yellow or white center
  • Oozing pus or crusting

Never pop a cyst on your buttocks, it does more harm than good!

Cysts are rare on the buttocks. But if you develop one, then it's critical you don't pop it.

Popping a cyst can result in the inflammation going to other body parts. It can even lead to cysts forming elsewhere. There's also the high risk of developing an infection. Ultimately, popping a cyst is painful, so leave that work to a licensed physician.

Tips to prevent future butt breakouts

If you're prone to butt breakouts, then follow these tips. They can help keep your buttocks clear and healthy.

  • Wash away sweat - Working out can lead to significant sweat buildup. While sweating can be good for your skin, you don't want to leave it there as it can clog your pores, especially on your buttocks.
  • Use a gentle exfoliator - If your buttocks gets irritated easily, then consider using an exfoliator for that area. Use a product containing lactic acid or salicylic acid for best results.
  • Talk to your dermatologist - In the event nothing seems to get rid of your folliculitis, then you may need professional help. Various prescription treatments are available.

Here's the best ways to treat cystic acne on other parts of your body

While cystic acne is the most severe type of acne you can have, the good news is that you won't have to live with it forever. There's a wide range of treatment options that (when combined with stronger oral antibiotics) have shown to combat those pesky red bumps for good.

  • Benzoyl Peroxide: Typically a main ingredient in many acne facial cleansers and lotions, benzoyl peroxide goes into your pores to lift and remove excess oil, dirt and debris (acne-causing agents).
  • Oral Contraceptives: For many women, cystic acne is linked to hormonal fluctuations. Using birth control pills has shown to help reduce acne.
  • Retinoids: One of the most successful acne treatments, retinoids expertly diminish sebum (excess oil), dirt, bacteria, and any other acne-causing agents on your skin's surface to prevent future breakouts. This powerful drug has also been proven to stop acne scars from forming, leaving behind only smooth, radiant skin.

Treat your acne fast! Get a prescription retinoid, today!

We understand how annoying and bothersome acne breakouts can be. Whether it's picture day at school, or you've got a job interview, acne is not a welcome friend. Fortunately, it's a treatable condition. Our licensed physicians make it easy and more comfortable to have a discussion about your skin and the best treatment options available for you.

Talk to one of our reputable online physicians to get your prescription Retinoid, today!

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