Ketamine Nasal Spray

Nasal Spray

What is Ketamine?

Ketamine is a synthetic pharmaceutical compound, classified as a dissociative anesthetic. It is one of the most widely used drugs in modern medicine, and is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. It was developed in 1963, FDA approved in 1970, and adopted by many hospitals and medical offices because of its rapid onset, proven safety, and short duration of action.

In the last two decades, ketamine has been increasingly clinically applied at subanesthetic doses (losenges and nasal sprays) as an off-label treatment for various chronic treatment-resistant mental health conditions, such as anxiety,  depression, alcoholism, substance dependencies, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other psychiatric diagnoses

When Will I See Positive Effects, and How Long Will They Last? Ketamine treatment can result in a number of benefits, and there are now many studies demonstrating its efficacy; however, it is still a relatively new and experimental psychiatric intervention, and there are no guarantees of your outcome. Ketamine is distinguished from other psychotropic medications by its rapid onset, often producing relief in as soon as a few hours. The literature indicates a 70% initial response rate to ketamine, as well as a remission rate (return of symptoms) for people with treatment-resistant depression of 40-50%

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About Ketamine Nasal Spray

What is Ketamine? Ketamine is a synthetic pharmaceutical compound, classified as a dissociative anesthetic. It is one of the most widely used drugs in modern medicine, and is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. It was developed in 1963, FDA approved in 1970, and adopted by many hospitals and medical offices because of its rapid onset, proven safety, and short duration of action.

In the last two decades, ketamine has been increasingly clinically applied at subanesthetic doses (losenges and nasal sprays) as an off-label treatment for various chronic treatment-resistant mental health conditions, such as anxiety,  depression, alcoholism, substance dependencies, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other psychiatric diagnoses

When Will I See Positive Effects, and How Long Will They Last? Ketamine treatment can result in a number of benefits, and there are now many studies demonstrating its efficacy; however, it is still a relatively new and experimental psychiatric intervention, and there are no guarantees of your outcome. Ketamine is distinguished from other psychotropic medications by its rapid onset, often producing relief in as soon as a few hours. The literature indicates a 70% initial response rate to ketamine, as well as a remission rate (return of symptoms) for people with treatment-resistant depression of 40-50%

What is Ketamine? Ketamine is a synthetic pharmaceutical compound, classified as a dissociative anesthetic. It is one of the most widely used drugs in modern medicine, and is on the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. It was developed in 1963, FDA approved in 1970, and adopted by many hospitals and medical offices because of its rapid onset, proven safety, and short duration of action.

In the last two decades, ketamine has been increasingly clinically applied at subanesthetic doses (losenges and nasal sprays) as an off-label treatment for various chronic treatment-resistant mental health conditions, such as anxiety,  depression, alcoholism, substance dependencies, post-traumatic stress disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, and other psychiatric diagnoses

When Will I See Positive Effects, and How Long Will They Last? Ketamine treatment can result in a number of benefits, and there are now many studies demonstrating its efficacy; however, it is still a relatively new and experimental psychiatric intervention, and there are no guarantees of your outcome. Ketamine is distinguished from other psychotropic medications by its rapid onset, often producing relief in as soon as a few hours. The literature indicates a 70% initial response rate to ketamine, as well as a remission rate (return of symptoms) for people with treatment-resistant depression of 40-50%

How Ketamine Works As mentioned, ketamine is classified as a dissociative anesthetic, where “dissociation” means a sense of disconnection between mind and body, and from one’s ordinary reality and usual sense of self. The present understanding of ketamine’s mode of action is as an NMDA antagonist working through the glutamate neurotransmitter system. (This is a different pathway than that of other psychiatric drugs such as the SSRIs, SNRIs, lamotrigine, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, etc.) In depression, the spindly receptors on neurons that facilitate signal transmission may recede, and the amygdala and hippocampus (both which help govern mood) may shrink. Animal research has shown that ketamine can stimulate neural growth within days (and sometimes hours). One hypothesis is that there is similar action in humans. Another hypothesis is that ketamine affords a reprieve from habitual patterns of thought that underlie mood and behavior, thereby creating an opportunity for learning new and healthier patterns of thought. There is no current consensus on mode of action, and other mechanisms may be found central to ketamine’s effects

Routes of administration  vary in the onset, bioavailability and duration of active effects for each person. Though research has demonstrated an antidepressant response to low doses that are minimally psychoactive or sub-psychedelic.

 

Some medical and psychiatric conditions need to be treated before you can safely take ketamine. These conditions include hallucinations, untreated mania, unstable angina (chest pain/heart disease), uncontrolled hyperthyroidism, increased intracranial pressure, evidence of liver disease, or a previously demonstrated allergy to ketamine. An EKG may be required for those with a history of arrhythmia or a history of cardiovascular issues. Untreated or uncontrolled hypertension is a contraindication to ketamine use as the substance causes a rise in blood pressure. This increase is typically comparable to normal increases in blood pressure that occur with heavy exercise. Pregnant women and nursing mothers are not eligible because of undetermined potential effects on the fetus or nursing child. Those with a history of cystitis or other bladder issues may need to be cleared by urological consultation, due to the rare but potentially significant adverse effect of cystitis. Those with a primary psychotic or dissociative disorder or who are currently in a manic or mixed episode are not eligible for treatment with ketamine.

Some medical and psychiatric conditions need to be treated before you can safely take ketamine. These conditions include hallucinations, untreated mania, unstable angina (chest pain/heart disease), uncontrolled hyperthyroidism, increased intracranial pressure, evidence of liver disease, or a previously demonstrated allergy to ketamine. An EKG may be required for those with a history of arrhythmia or a history of cardiovascular issues. Untreated or uncontrolled hypertension is a contraindication to ketamine use as the substance causes a rise in blood pressure. This increase is typically comparable to normal increases in blood pressure that occur with heavy exercise. Pregnant women and nursing mothers are not eligible because of undetermined potential effects on the fetus or nursing child. Those with a history of cystitis or other bladder issues may need to be cleared by urological consultation, due to the rare but potentially significant adverse effect of cystitis. Those with a primary psychotic or dissociative disorder or who are currently in a manic or mixed episode are not eligible for treatment with ketamine.

Some medical and psychiatric conditions need to be treated before you can safely take ketamine. These conditions include hallucinations, untreated mania, unstable angina (chest pain/heart disease), uncontrolled hyperthyroidism, increased intracranial pressure, evidence of liver disease, or a previously demonstrated allergy to ketamine. An EKG may be required for those with a history of arrhythmia or a history of cardiovascular issues. Untreated or uncontrolled hypertension is a contraindication to ketamine use as the substance causes a rise in blood pressure. This increase is typically comparable to normal increases in blood pressure that occur with heavy exercise. Pregnant women and nursing mothers are not eligible because of undetermined potential effects on the fetus or nursing child. Those with a history of cystitis or other bladder issues may need to be cleared by urological consultation, due to the rare but potentially significant adverse effect of cystitis. Those with a primary psychotic or dissociative disorder or who are currently in a manic or mixed episode are not eligible for treatment with ketamine.